Interviewing for Residency

Ah, shoot, I disappeared again. Well, I have finally finished up my interviews for residency this year. I can’t say that I am an expert by any means, but hopefully this will help answer at least some questions.

What to Wear

I’m not going to lie- this was somehow one of the biggest anxieties I had going into the season. Skirt vs. pant suit? What color blouse? It’s rough for a women, let me tell you! There are just so many options. After having interviewed, I can tell you that basically as long as you look professional, it seems anything goes. I’ve seen both pant and skirt options (just make sure the skirt is knee length and practice sitting down too). Make sure to cut the back seams on your skirt/blazer if they are new; one of my friends saw someone who hadn’t done that and we all mentally cringed. Any dark color seems fine. I would definitely wear pantyhose if you are wearing a skirt suit, and most girls I saw wore a nude pair. Shoes: heels shouldn’t be too high, flats are okay, make sure you’re comfortable walking around. Blouse: I tried to be really conservative but I saw just about everything on the trail, including ruffles, patterns, and bright colors. I really think as long as you aren’t distasteful (e.g. a plunging neckline), it’s okay. As everyone says, you’re not interviewing to show off your fashion sense, but you shouldn’t also feel like you have to suddenly rush out and buy a new closet (which… I did).

interviewoutfit

What I wore: simple black pumps with a thick heel around 2 inches tall, nude hose, a new Halogen skirt suit, and a new LOFT blouse. I justified my purchases because the suit was on sale, and I can definitely rewear all of them.

How to Prep

I created an Evernote document of common interview questions, and I BRIEFLY answered all of them with clinical examples. I also had a separate section of just clinical stories that stood out to me so that I could remember them and apply them to certain questions. Interestingly, I got very few of the “common” interview questions, but I would still know how to answer them — why this specialty, why this residency, what makes you special.

Definitely know your application inside out. I reread my app before the first couple of interviews and then eventually got so used to answering the same questions that I stopped. I got asked most about my research but got different questions even then- some just wanted me to explain what I was doing, others asked me to predict what my results would be, one person hardcore challenged the whole necessity of the project.

Day of Interview/Dinner

If you can, I definitely recommend making the interview social dinner, which is usually the night before. It’s a great time to meet your other applicants (and remember, these are your future colleagues!) and the residents in a casual setting. I greatly enjoyed all of mine. I wore a sweater dress, tights, and boots.

The interview day: make sure you arrive early and are abreast of your surroundings if you are unfamiliar with them. I would try to ask the residents the night before about specific directions to get to the interview location. Again, put your best face forward but be yourself. Try to put yourself into the mindset that you too are interviewing the residency; this should help with the ever confusing “do you have any questions for me?” part of the interview. Some of the questions I asked about include the culture of the residency, how evaluations are performed, what are the weaknesses of the program/what would one change about the program, how call is handled. Otherwise, just have fun! Most interviews are very conversational.

Afterward, you can choose to send thank you letters. Some places tell you not to at all. In general, most people sent letters to the program director and chair of department, and maybe someone you clicked with. I don’t think it matters much whether you do.

Well, that’s all I can think of! Feel free to drop questions in the comments, and good luck!

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M2

Something happened in the past few weeks that finally made me realize that I’m actually about to be a doctor. I don’t know what it was; perhaps it was wrapping up the cardiovascular system, which happens to cover most of America’s healthcare problems in a compressed bursting-at-the-seams 4 week package. It could also be because we got our clerkship schedules for the coming year (I got plastics and ENT for my surgical subs, which I’m extremely happy and excited for!). It could be actually being able to read an EKG, knowing what treatments to give someone who’s going through a heart attack, being able to hear and identify a murmur. It could’ve been that I had to teach some of the lay public how to do the cranial nerve exam. Something happened, and it finally occurred to me that I really am not just a student going through the motions, but I’m actually almost a doctor. Wow.